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5 Benefits of a UK Walking Holiday

5 Benefits of a UK Walking Holiday


There's a reason that so many people choose to do a walking holiday in the UK - in fact there are many reasons! The benefits of a UK walking holiday are both physical and spiritual - here are a few of the best...

 

Fitness

An obvious one to start off with. Everyone knows that best way to get fit and stay fit is to find something active that they enjoy. For some that might be running on a treadmill in the gym – but can you really think of a better way to get your body working hard and your heart pumping than climbing to the top of a steep hill or mountain and drinking in a beautiful view? Do that every day for a whole week, or longer, and just imagine how good you’ll feel. Of course, not all walking holidays have to be hard work – some of the UK’s best walking tours are gently rambles through largely flat landscapes, but the exercise is still an important part of the experience.

 

5 Benefits of a UK Walking Holiday

 

5 Benefits of a UK Walking Holiday

This lot are working hard - just imagine how fit they'll be at the end of their trip!

 

Spiritual Well-being

It isn’t just your physical fitness that benefits from a walking holiday. It’s long been proved that exercise, fresh air, connection with nature and exposure to glorious views and wide open spaces are good for both the body and the soul. And at the end of the trip, the sense of achievement you get from having completed the challenge is something that will stay with you for a very long time. Sure, a week lying on a beach is all well and good (for some), but how long do those memories last compared to the ever changing landscapes of a walking holiday? 

 

5 Benefits of a UK Walking Holiday

These two look pretty happy, don't they?

 

5 Benefits of a UK Walking Holiday

Wide open spaces and magnificent views - good for the soul!

 

History


The UK countryside isn’t just about glorious views – there’s some fascinating history to delve into on many of the popular routes. There’s Offa’s Dyke, built in the 8th century by Offa, the King of Mercia, to keep out the Welsh marauders. Or Hadrian’s Wall, started by the Roman Emperor in 122 AD to separate the Roman Empire from the ‘barbarians’ to the North. Then there’s the smuggling history all round the Cornish Coast, Queen Victoria’s connection with the Isle of Wight, and so much more. Wherever you decide to walk, there are stories to learn, and famous footsteps to walk in.

 

Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian's Wall

 

Osborne House on the Isle of Wight

Osborne House, Queen Victoria's retreat on the Isle of Wight

 

Food and Drink

Traditional British food has taken a bit of a knock in years gone by, compared to our European neighbours. But not anymore – people have woken up to the choice and quality of traditional dishes served up in regions across the UK, and now the food is one of the highlights of any walking holiday in Britain. Throw in some of the finest beer and ale to be brewed anywhere in the world, and you have a recipe for a delicious meal at the end of each day’s walking. 

Here are just a few of our favourite regional specialities to be found in the UK:


Cornwall - Stargazy Pie:
A classic fish pie, made with pilchards or sardines, eggs and potatoes, covered in a pastry crust. Whilst recipes vary, the one common feature is fish heads protruding from the crust, as though their gazing at the stars, which is where the pie gets its name from.

The Lake District – Cumberland Sausage: Why have individual sausages when you could have one long sausage, coiled into a ring so it retains all of its juices and peppery flavour. Often served on top of a bed of creamy mashed potato and covered with rich gravy.

Yorkshire – Parkin: A moist, spicy, sticky, gingery cake. Perfect with a good cup of Yorkshire tea!

West Highland Way – Seafood: Scotland offers some of the best seafood in the world – and on the West Highland Way you’ll be savour some of the tastiest. Oysters, crab, lobster, razor shell clams – fresh from the sea.

 

This is just a start – there are so many classic dishes around the UK, you’ll have to keep coming back to make sure you try them all!

 

Yorkshire Parkin

Yorkshire Parkin

 

Scottish Seafood Platter

A typical Scottish seafood platter

 

Nature and Wildlife

Wherever you walk in the UK, you’re quite likely to encounter some fantastic wildlife – birds of prey, red deer, grey seals and shaggy feral goats are just some of the animals you might come across. And if fossils are more your thing, then the Jurassic Coast of Dorset and the Isle of Wight offer some great opportunities for fossil hunting on your route. As for flora and natural phenomena, there are waterfalls, rivers, spectacular rock formations (such as the famous Durdle Door in Dorset), flowers, grasslands, hedgerows and pretty much every other type of natural landscape you can imagine. For a pretty small country, the UK certainly packs a lot in!

 

Scottish Puffins
Puffins on St Cuthberts Way

A Grey Seal
A grey seal

Durdle Door in Dorset
The Dorset Coast with Durdle Door in the background

If this has inspired you to book a walking holiday in the UK, you can browse our full programme here.

Travelled with Sherpa in 2018? We want to hear from you!

Travellers' Tales

Have you been on a trip with Sherpa Expeditions this year? If the answer’s yes, then we’d love you to tell us, and the world, about your trip.

Here at Sherpa Expeditions we believe that our customers are at the heart of everything we do, and the best way to get a flavour of one of our trips is to read about the experience of someone who’s already travelled with us.

 

So before that 2018 holiday becomes a long-distant memory, we’d love you to write a short account of your trip. We’re not looking for a straightforward review of your experience like you'd write on a feedback form – we’d love you to include things like your reasons for booking on to a particular trip, your highlights, your lowlights and what sort of effect did the walk (or cycle) have on you, and your feet!

 

If your story makes it on to the Travellers’ Tales section of our blog, you’ll receive £50 off the next trip you book with us.

 

Not a writer? No problem!

We’re not looking for Shakespearean perfection – what’s important is that your tale comes from your heart, using your own voice. And if you’d like, you can always send us rough notes and we’ll help to turn them into a rounded article.

 

We can also send you a list of ‘interview’ questions to help you shape your story – have a look at this recent one by Jan from Australia and you’ll get the idea.

 

Travellers' Tales

 

Pictures paint a thousand words

Online blogs work best when there are some great photos alongside them, so please include your photos from the trip when you send us your story.

 

If you’d prefer to go down a more visual route, your tale could even take the form of a photo gallery with a caption accompanying each shot. Videos are great as well – we’re always looking for more video content so if you have anything suitable that you’re happy to share, please send it on to us.

 

Travellers' Tales

 

How to get involved

Please email connect@sherpaexpeditions.co.uk if you have something you’d like to send us, if you have any questions, or if you’d like us to send you a list of interview questions. We’re here to help, and we’re very happy to have a chat before you head to your keyboard.

Treasures of the Dordogne: Nathalie's Trip Highlights

Dordogne Self Guided Walking

 

Sherpa HQ team member Nathalie headed to the Dordogne with her mum in September for some autumn sunshine, and to savour the delights of this beautiful region of France. Here she gives us her top 5 reasons to try this self-guided walking trip for yourself.

 

GET AWAY FROM THE HUSTLE & BUSTLE 

Now I see why the trip is called Hidden Treasures of the Dordogne. It was certainly reflected in the number of walkers mum & I saw, which were only a couple every few days. For me this made it feel like much more of a special & immersive experience, and also encouraged me to practice my rusty French more!

 

Dordogne Self-Guided Walking

A typical sleepy hamlet - Greze.

 

Dordogne Self-Guided Walking

Lush forests provide welcome shade from the hot sun.

 

Dordogne Self-Guided Walking

The walnut groves got more and more plentiful as the walk goes on. Thanks to mum I can now identify chestnuts, figs etc. It was like having my own guide! 

 

GAZE OVER THE VISTAS  

As I normally tend to gravitate towards mountains, I wasn’t sure if the landscape in rural France would entertain me for the week - but I needn’t have worried. Each day offered beautiful, varied landscapes that came with their own highlights. Country fields, walnut orchards, gorges, forests and rivers - there was always something beautiful to absorb.

 

Dordogne Self-Guided Walking

Kayakers at Beaulieu-Sur-Dorogne.

 

Dordogne Self-Guided Walking

Glimpsing Curemont as we descend after our picnic – don’t forget to visit the Lou Pé de Grill farm shop as you enter the village!

 

Dordogne Self-Guided Walking
The climbs are worth it when you get rewarding views like this.

 

EXPLORE MEDIEVAL VILLAGES & CAVES

The league table for French villages is the exclusive 143 top villages in the country, and you visit several just in this trip. I actually felt like I had stepped back in time or into a fairy tale. If, like me, you enjoy photography and finding local produce, you’ll be in your element.

 

Dordogne Self-Guided Walking
Carennac on the morning of the last day.  Not only do you visit lovely villages, you get to stay in them too.

Dordogne Self-Guided Walking
The impressive Chateau de Castelnaud.

The Padirac Caves were a wonderous, cooling detour at only 13 degrees Celsius, when it’s 27 above ground.  More than 100m below ground, I loved floating on an underground river and seeing all the weird and wonderful formations which we named “the jellyfish” and “the cauliflower” - although like cloud shapes, we all see different things!

Padirac Caves, Dordogne

Padirac Caves – after the short boat ride you get a chance to explore the caves on foot.

 

SAMPLE THE LOCAL CUISINE 

It’s funny how quickly you get used to three-course dinners, and in the Dordogne Valley you certainly get spoilt. I’m not sure if my calories burned cancelled out the calories consumed, but it was worth it.  In my mind it was guilt-free after the hikes anyway!  Starting off the week at the Bonne Famille, which has been in the same family for some 97 years now, we could feel the love in the service and the food. As an area famed for confit why wouldn’t you indulge in duck or cassoulet? And the food highs just kept coming.

 

Dordogne Cuisine

The Bonne Famille served tasty duck home-cooked meals.

 

Dordogne Cuisine
Hostellerie Fenelon’s Lamb two ways was packed with flavour.

 

INDULGE YOURSELF WITH WINE & CHEESE – YOU’VE EARNED IT!

When a cheese board with a selection of more than 10 cheeses is set in front you, you can’t not smile. It’s even better after you’ve been enjoying a bottle of the local red from Glanes, which can only be bought locally, and if you have the right contacts.  Luckily the proprietor of the Hostellerie Fenelon has friends in the right places!

 

Dordogne Wine

Look out for this wine on the menus – the traditional blend is perfect as it compliments many dishes.

 

Dordogne Cheeses

Save room for the local goat’s cheese if you can!


My conclusion – this was a wonderful trip that certainly convinced me that you don’t have to be in the mountains to enjoy nature. This is a beautiful region of France, with friendly people, delicious food and fantastic wine. I would recommend it to anyone who wants to get a proper taste of French countryside and culture.


2019 dates for Hidden Treasures of the Dordogne are now available to book - with the option of either an 8-day or 10-day itinerary .

Cornwall with a Camera

For this month’s photo gallery, we’re delighted to have teamed up with photographer Andy Cox, whose website

cornwallwithacamera.com features some of the most stunning shots we’ve ever seen of this truly beautiful part of the UK. Andy has lived there for nearly all of his life – few people know the magic and charm of Cornwall’s breath-taking landscapes better than him. All of the photos you can see in this gallery, plus many more, can be purchased as prints and photo gifts from his website, and you can also find him on Facebook and Instagram. Andy has also taken many photos of other parts of the UK, most notably the Isles of Scilly, the Lake District and the Scottish Highlands.
 
Most importantly, every location featured in this gallery is visited on one or more of our Cornwall walking or cycling holidays – so you can enjoy the magnificence of these places in the flesh. Booking for 2019 is now open, so what are you waiting for?

 

Bedruthan

 

Bedruthan

 

Bedruthan

 

Bedruthan

 

Cheesering at sunset

 

Cheesering at sunset

 

Bottalack

 

Botallack

 

Droskyn Castle

 

Droskyn Castle

 

Godrevy Lighthouse at sunset

 

Godrevy Lighthouse at sunset

 

Godrevy Lighthouse in a storm


Godrevy Lighthouse in a storm

 

Bodmin Moor

 

Bodmin Moor in golden light

 

High tide sunset at St Michael's Mount

 

High tide sunset at St Michael's Mount

 

Holywell Sunset

 

Holywell sunset

 

Holywell sunset

 

Holywell sunset

 

Holywell sunset

 

Holywell sunset

 

Land's End

 

Land's End

 

The Lizard

 

The Lizard

 

Pentire

 

Pentire

 

Perranporth

 

Perranporth

 

Poly Joke, Pentire

 

Poly Joke, Pentire

 

Porthcurno Passage

 

Porthcurno Passage

 

Porthcurno

 

Porthcurno

 

St Agnes

 

St Agnes

 

Trevaunance Cove, St Agnes

 

Trevaunance Cove, St Agnes

 

Wheal Coates

 

Wheal Coates

 

Wheal Coates

 

Wheal Coates

 

Wheal Coates

 

Wheal Coates

Coming Soon - New Trips for 2019

The Summer was a busy time for our resident guide, John, who tried out a couple of new walks that we will be operating in 2019. In fact, the first one was not a new walk at all, but the oldest National Trail in Britain - the famous Pennine Way

Walking by Hadrian's Wall
Walking by Hadrian's Wall on the Pennine Way  

 

Blessed with great sunshine, and with only 1.5 hours of rain during the duration of the walk over some 20 days, the 260 mile walk was completed in ‘redneck’ style! The trek follows the high trails, packhorse routes and Roman roads from Edale in Derbyshire to Kirk Yethom in Scotland, along the Pennine chain of hills, aptly named by the Romans after their own Appenines running along the spine of Italy. There are some amazing views and features on this walk, particularly the waterfalls of the Tees Valley, the limestone scenery around Malham and the most attractive part of Hadrian’s Wall.  Hopefully you’ll get the views from several big peaks such as Kinder Scout, Blackhill, Cross Fell and The Cheviot. Very few people walk the Pennine Way compared to the Coast to Coast -some areas have limited accommodation, but those who do tend to revel in the experience of visiting attractive villages that they would not normally have heard of, such as Edale, Bellingham, Dufton and Alston - mixed with more famous places such as Malham, Horton and Keld. There are also some very idiosyncratic places such as Tan Hill and Byrness. It’s a tough old walk but the challenge is made worth it not by a medal at the end, but by a certificate and the free half-pint of beer given to you at the Border Hotel in Kirk Yethom. Mind you, by that time you’ll have probably already drunk at least 30 pints of the finest beer in Christendom!  

 

The Pennine Way - Cross Fell from Dun Fell

Cross Fell from Dun Fell

 

Descending towards the Schill from Cheviot

Descending towards the Schill from Cheviot

 

The Pennine Way - River Tees

River Tees

 

The second new trip is one to join those that we already offer in the Canary Islands - this time to La Palma, a gorgeous dormant volcanic island whose rich soils have spawned a profundity of the special Laurisilva vegetation, that at times creates its own clouds on the eastern side of the mountain. 

 

La Palma - the Caldera de Taburiente

La Palma - the Caldera de Taburiente

 

The island of La Palma is essentially one huge caldera that tapers to the south to more recent volcanoes - the last eruption was in 1971. On a two centre based stay in the towns of Santa Cruz and Los Llanos, John ventured out on walks that threaded through the forests to view points, and others that took him to the highest points of the island on peaks, down gorges and to the coast. La Palma is quite old fashioned, offering a good selection of restaurants and a nice family atmosphere in the villages and towns. As expected there is a lot of great seafood including tuna, squid and octopus. There are avocados, apples and a large banana cultivation, which is the island’s main economy. There are certainly things to do on a day off from walking, including boat trips to whale watch and a visit to dramatic sea caves. La Palma is also a world centre in astronomy. Visiting the island has certainly been made easier by the introduction of Easyjet flights from London Gatwick from autumn through to spring.

 

La Palma - Coastal Scenery

La Palma - Coastal Scenery

 

La Palma - near the Caldera

Near the caldera

 

Laurisilva Forest

Laurisilva Forest

 

Both of these trips will be available to book soon – so watch this space. To register your interest, email sales@sherpaexpeditions.co.uk and we’ll contact you when booking opens. 

Autumn Foliage in Europe

The Americans call it leaf peeping,  the Japanese call it momiji gari. But if you're looking to be inspired by the shades of autumn foliage, you don't need to travel all the way to New England or the Far East – Sherpa Expeditions have a number of trips departing in the next few weeks where you can experience the splendour of the changing leaves.

 

PORTUGAL | Douro RAMBLER

Surround yourself with colour as autumn transforms the photogenic Douro River Valley, which slices across northern Portugal. As the terraced vineyards that slope along the riverbanks prepare for winter, they turn into an endless sea of red, orange and yellow. From visiting small working wine estates to taking scenic boat trips, there will be plenty of opportunities for wine tasting tours, where you can fortify yourself against the autumn chill with a glass of the region’s famed local port. 

 

Departure dates until 15 October - click here for details and booking.

 

Portugal in early Autumn

 

 

SPAIN | hiking in hidden Andalucía

The weather in Andalucía’s mountains can be harsh in the summer and winter months – but visit in autumn for beautiful gold and yellow colours of chestnuts and poplars lighting up the valleys, while the hedgerows and paths are lined with figs, mulberries, walnuts and pomegranates. With the snowy peaks of the Sierra Nevada as a backdrop, this is an exhilarating walk among terraced fields and through white-washed villages and along irrigation channels that date back to the Moorish era. 

 

Departure dates until 20 November - click here for details and booking.

 

Autumn chestnuts in Spain

 

 

GERMANY | Bavaria - King Ludwig's Way

Saturated with alpine flowers in spring and crowded with tourists in summer, southern Germany offers more relaxed tempos for leaf-peeping during the autumn months. Home to the idyllic Romantic Road, this is fairy-tale country, with geranium-bedecked chalets, onion-shaped church spires and copper-turreted castles rising out of red and green forests – including the enchanting Neuschwanstein Castle, the eccentric King Ludwig’s most famous architectural masterpiece.

 

Departure dates until 22 October - click here for details and booking.

 

Bavaria in Autumn

 

 

AUSTRIA | The Lake District and Dachstein Alps

Towering peaks, high mountain passes, alpine meadows and lakeside walks are all combined in this surprisingly compact area – there is nowhere better to experience autumn unfold in Austria than the heart of the Lake District, which encompasses 76 crystal clear lakes, the impressive Dachstein Glacier and breathtaking rock faces up to 3,000 vertical metres high. Wander through ochre mountain forests, explore glimmering lakeland shores and visit alpine villages of wooden chalets. 

 

Departure dates until 20 October - click here for details and booking.

 

Austria in autumn

 

If you like the look of these trips but would prefer to visit next spring, summer or autumn, you can book for 2019 now.



10 Reasons to do the Tour du Mont Blanc with Sherpa Expeditions

Our 2019 dates have been announced for the Tour du Mont Blanc – so now is the time to secure your place on one of the classic alpine walking tours. Here are just some of the reasons why we think you should book this spectacular trip…

 

Tour du Mont Blanc  

 

1. EIGHT fixed departure days for summer 2019

The Tour du Mont Blanc is a self guided walking holiday – but due to the logistics of baggage transfer, the trip departs on fixed dates throughout the summer season. Our 8 departure dates, spanning the entire summer, give you plenty of options for when to do the trip.

 

Tour du Mont Blanc

 

2. Support from our friendly, knowledgeable team in London

Our London office is staffed by people with plenty of walking experience, and an in-depth knowledge of our holidays. They can provide you with all the information you need and answer all of your questions, providing support both before and during your trip.

 

Tour du Mont Blanc

 

3. Walk independently, but at the same time as other Sherpa travellers

Although the Tour du Mont Blanc is a self guided holiday, the fact that the trip departs on fixed dates means there will always be a small number of other Sherpa walkers doing the tour at the same time. So you can be as sociable or independent as you like – it’s the best of both worlds!

 

Tour du Mont Blanc

 

4. Enjoy the benefits of support from our team members who live in the area

Our friendly local staff who take care of your baggage transfers also act as your contacts in case of any problems, or simply to offer advice and information.

 

Tour du Mont Blanc

 

5. Our route notes are second to none

When you book with Sherpa you’ll receive a pack including detailed route notes, maps and information on local points of interest and attractions. The notes have been prepared by experts with intimate knowledge of the area, and also include details of alternative routes for certain parts of the tour.

 

Tour du Mont Blanc

 

6. Enjoy a meet & greet on your first night

The evening before you set off from Les Houches for your first day’s walking, our ground support staff will hold a briefing to give you all the information you need and to ask any questions you might have. It also gives you the opportunity to meet the other Sherpa travellers who’ll be doing the walk at the same time as you.

 

Tour du Mont Blanc

 

7. Solo travellers can avoid paying a single supplement

If you’re a solo traveller and are happy to share a room with another traveller (of the same gender), you won’t have to pay a single supplement - as long as we can pair you up. (NB: there are no single rooms available in Les Chapieux, on the 3rd night of the tour, and if not paired up single travellers will have to stay in a small dormitory at Refuge Les Mottets, which is 7km further up on the route).

 

Tour du Mont Blanc

 

8. First-timer on a self guided walk? No problem!

Although the Tour du Mont Blanc provides views of breath-taking alpine scenery, the walk itself is graded as ‘moderate to challenging’ and requires no mountaineering experience. This means that anyone with the level of fitness required to walk for 6 to 7 hours a day on uneven ground should find it within their capabilities. Some of the walks can be shortened by the use of cable cars or local bus services.

 

Tour du Mont Blanc

 

9. Enjoy the culture of 3 different countries

One of the most enjoyable aspects of the Tour du Mont Blanc is that you’ll pass through France, Italy and Switzerland, each with its own culture, customers and delicious food and wine. A true European adventure awaits you.

 

Tour du Mont Blanc

 

10. Rest days, or extra walking days - the choice is yours

The itinerary includes 3 ‘rest’ days when you can take it easy – but there’s certainly no need to rest if you’re feeling energetic! There’s plenty to explore in all of the areas (the route notes will provide information), or you can choose to do some extra walking if you prefer.

 

A Mont Blanc Marmotte!

Find more details, dates and book online, for the Tour du Mont Blanc Self Guided Walk.


Gear Matters: Get Your (Wash) Kit Out!

Gear tips for walking holidays with Sherpa ExpeditionsEvery month our resident guide, John Millen, brings you an anecdote, update, or tip on the gear you are likely to use on a walking or cycling holiday. Always from his personal point of view. This month he takes a look at an essential yet often overlooked area - your toiletries and wash kit, and how to save weight and space in your luggage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the world of travel and back-packing, where it’s important to keep weight down, one of the least obvious places to start is your wash kit. It’s amazing how much a bag of soaps, gels, pastes and brushes add up. So many people bring full size containers of everything from toothpaste to shampoo, big cans of deodorant and heavy towels. Of course a distinction could be made between tours, where basic soaps and shampoos may be provided by hotels and B&Bs, and camping trips where more items may be required, but sometimes even in a hotel you may not find basic items such as soap or a plug.

 

Perhaps don't pack anything toiletry wise, until you get to the airport! If you are flying from UK airports, most have a chemist such as Boots air-side. Boots have tried hard to develop useful and very travel-friendly items: small deodorants, hand gels, shampoos, and folding toothbrushes which fold into their own handle. On a normal one or two week trip you won't need a large volume of tooth paste for instance.  

 

Another way of doing it is filling your own bottles with your favourite brand of shampoo etc. If you can make the effort to decant these at home you could buy something like the LifeVenture Silicone Air Travel Bottles Set. These fulfil carry-on liquid volume requirements and are reusable, as the silicone does not perish or crack like conventional plastic containers.

 

Silicone Travel Bottles

 

Soaps

The lightest way forward here are Soap Leaves (from LifeVenture) which come in a plastic container and you just add to water depending on what needs to be cleaned. Although light, these are hard to get on with because they just seem too weak to work, and the temptation is to just keep pulling more out of the container - and once your hand is wet, the whole container of them gets wet. Much better is a simple block of soap, maybe cut in half as it can be used for scrubbing clothes, and will dry very quickly and can be wrapped into a towel. You could also consider taking a shampoo bar rather than a traditional bottle of liquid shampoo. These are concentrated blocks of shampoo that can outlast two to three bottles of the liquid stuff - one manufacturer claims that one bar will last up to 80 washes! 

 

Plug or Washbowl

I used to carry a travel sink plug for budget hotels and hostels so that you knew you were going to be able to wash clothes each night. I’m quite surprised these days how many hotels either don’t have plugs, have lost them, or have ill-fitting ones. This may be because some basins don't have an overflow and they are worried about flooding. However a travel plug can be a good investment (Boots, Lifeventure). They come in different sizes so that you aren’t caught out with a non-standard size, and some are just silicone circles that fit over the plug hole and are held in place and seal with water pressure. For camping trips, a great luxury, but very useful, is a lightweight collapsible travel bowl (Ortlieb, Lifeventure). They are great because you can decant water from springs and streams and wash in your tent or under a tree without contaminating water sources. I have always carried one in Morocco and on the World Expeditions Simien Mountains and Rinjani trips. Even in hotels they can be useful, because you can soak clothes separately and still use your sink. 

 

Travel Plug and Washbowl

 

Towels

After washing you need a towel! Lightweight towels are quite hard to get used to - they can feel like large panels of blotting paper. They dry quickly, but they also saturate quickly. Most of them claim to be anti-bacterial which means they should not smell too much after prolonged use. They often have drying hooks. The hardest thing is folding them up to fit into the sachets they come in after use, especially with wet and cold fingers.

 

Drying Clothes

After rinsing and wringing out clothes, you can roll them up in a large travel towel to dry them. Then with the risk of turning your hotel room into a laundry, many outdoor shops and even Boots sell travel washing lines that do not weigh a bean, but can take up a number of items.  

 

Travel Washing Line and Lightweight Towel

 

Obviously you will want all of your toiletries conveniently stored in one place so that you can find items easily enough. The neatest way forward in this respect will be a lightweight roll-up wash bag (Osprey and Lifeventure do some nice ones). But quite frankly you could just use a strong poly bag with a few holes in it, to save even more weight! 

 

Travel Washbags

Travellers' Tales - Coast to Coast Guided Walk by Jan Clarke

Jan Clarke, from Western Australia, booked on to the Guided Coast to Coast walk in order to reconnect with her UK roots, and to feed her passion for walking. Here, she shares her experience, and her tips for looking after your most important piece of kit - your feet!

 

Guided Coast to Coast Walk - lunch overlooking the valley

 

What is your walking history?

I have enjoyed walking ever since I was a little girl growing up in Tasmania, Australia. I spent a lot of weekends in my primary school years free-ranging over the foothills of Mount Wellington and the National Parks in Tassie. As a family we hiked in to say farewell to the original Lake Pedder before it was dammed and flooded to feed the hydro-electric scheme. It was a local pilgrimage. I think dad used to like the freedom and fresh air of wide open space, and my brothers and I had lots of energy to get rid of. I guess it just got into my bones. I still work full time at 60, but in the last decade I’ve found time to hike in the Colorado and Canadian Rockies, the Italian Cinque Terre, Table Mountain in South Africa, the calderas of volcanoes in Bali and Hawaii, the summit of Cradle Mountain and Freycinet Peninsula, the Blue Mountains, Central Australia, the gorges in The Kimberley and Pilbara and parts of the Bibbulmun Track and the Cape to Cape in Western Australia. I have never walked 13 consecutive days before, though! I am more used to hiking in very hot, dry conditions than boggy, cold and rainy.

Guided Coast to Coast Walk - wheat field

 

Why did you choose to walk where you did?

This walk was for my dad. He was a “10 Pound Pom” who emigrated to Australia in the 50s. He gave me my love of hiking. I believe you have to “walk a country to know a country” and I wanted to feel my family roots and feel connected to my heritage. I love visiting National Parks and this walk had three in a row! I like a physical challenge so I chose something that would make me sweat. I figured the Coast to Coast would tick all those boxes – and it did. I gave myself the walk as my 60th birthday present and was happy to fly to the UK by myself to prove I could meet the challenge. My dad certainly came with me… in spirit, anyway.

 

Guided Coast to Coast Walk - descent to Patterdale

 

How did you prepare?

Preparation for mountains was a bit difficult where I live. I can walk forever on flat ground because there is a LOT of that in Perth and I have always enjoyed long walks. The most we have close by is a scarp, the Perth Hills, so I spent every weekend for 4-5 hours at a time hiking fast up and down stony, gravelly tracks just to make sure my leg muscles, reflexes and concentration were honed. Actually, I think it was an advantage to have practised on harsh stones because there are a lot of those on the Coast to Coast. Another advantage was being used to hiking in hot weather with hot feet. I think that saved me from getting blisters. I think some mental preparation is a good thing too. I have spent my life being stubborn. I don’t like to let things beat me!

 

Your favourite destination?

This was definitely St Sunday Crag! Everything about that day was perfect – the scenery, the weather, the vibe. It was a challenging, strenuous, heat-pounding walk but there was just something about standing on those rocks at the top that made me feel WOW! I love standing on top of any mountain, but that one was a real winner for me. That’s my mountain! 

 

Guided Coast to Coast Walk - St Sunday Crag

 

Best food and drink?

To be honest, everything was amazing and a real taste of so many things “English”. I did not expect little places to have such excellent meals. Truly. Part of my concept of “knowing a country” is also to try local foods and drink, so I did. A memorable one was bacon chop with black pudding and stilton cream sauce at the pub at Ennerdale Bridge. Absolutely delicious – and something I would NEVER have tried at home. Rachael’s fresh berries and rhubarb yoghurt at Gillercombe B&B in Rosthwaite – oh YUM! The beef and ale pie at The White Lion in Patterdale was outstanding. The Wainwright beer and rhubarb gin were winners everywhere. Oh, and the blueberry and cream ice-cream at the PO in Patterdale and the scones, jam and cream everywhere, but especially at the little café with the penny-farthing bikes in Gunnerside. Thumbs up, too, to the publican at The Station Tavern in Grosmont who made extra space for ten of us for dinner, served up a cracking meal at a cracking pace, and then gave four of us a lift home. Above and beyond the call! 

 

Guided Coast to Coast Walk - woodland path

 

Biggest surprise?

I probably shouldn’t admit to this. The thing that surprised me the most was that I managed to fully recover every morning and be ready to go again! I know that should be a given expectation when you sign up for a long hike. Seriously – by the end of every day the balls of my feet were so sore I thought I would never walk again, but every morning they were perfectly fine and raring to go again. So I think my nanna body pleasantly surprised me the most. As for the knees - so pleased I was a hockey player and swimmer and not a netballer or tennis player in my youth!

 

What aspect of the trip did you find most challenging?

I think the 2 very long days towards the end of the walk were pretty challenging, mentally and physically. Every single day had its little challenges, but that’s what I wanted. I didn’t want an easy wander. I wanted to have to work at it. Having the sole of my hiking boot detach unexpectedly at the top of Kidsty Pike in a sleet storm was a little north of “interesting”. However, my husband calls me “Mrs MacGyver” because I enjoy the satisfaction of creatively solving problems. John also had duct tape and clever ideas in his emergency box of tricks, so between us we worked it out and the group never skipped a beat. Gotta love a good challenge. Keeps you young on the inside. Like All Bran for the soul.

 

Guided Coast to Coast Walk - the group

 

Do you have any other advice for travellers thinking about travelling on this trip?

My best tip sounds like the most obvious. Look after your feet! They need to be your friends. If they’re not used to walking for two weeks solid, then tape them up with Fixomull (or slap on the Compede) BEFORE you start. Any investment in being kind to your feet will pay off ten-fold. If you feel hot-spots developing then stop and patch them immediately. Don’t be shy! Poles were also really useful. There are plenty of places where the pressure they take off downhill hiking or help with stability on uneven ground is really useful. I also had magic butterscotch lollies. Pop one at the beginning of a hill and it’s amazing how a little sugar buzz powers you up a hill (unless you are one of the good souls who have sworn off the evil of sugar, of course). Take every kind of clothing in your day-pack as the weather can change in an instant. Oh - and take a spare pair of hiking boots. Your faves might give in well before you ever do! 

 

>> Find out more about Sherpa Expeditions' Coast to Coast walking and cycling holidays.

The Great British Isles

British Isles walking holidays - Sherpa Expeditions

 

Great Britain, the large island in the North Sea, is surrounded by plenty of smaller isles and islets, which offer unique opportunities to go for a walking or cycling holiday.

 

Just the fact that you are on an island gives an instant and sheer holiday feeling. On top of that, there is the special journey to reach the island; which often includes a short ferry or boat ride to increase the sensation even more. Island life is usually slow-paced and local people seem more relaxed, hospitable and are often in for a chat. Add to that a constant sea breeze, fresh seafood and stunning ocean vistas and you’ve got yourself the perfect great British island holiday.

 

Below, we list five of so called British isles that you can choose to discover on several of our cycling and walking holidays.

 

#1 Isle of Wight

Isle of Wight walking holidays - Sherpa Expeditions

 

Queen Victoria, despite ruling a quarter of the Earth and being Empress of India, elected to spend her holidays on the Isle of Wight. Here she had a little holiday cottage build called Osborne House - her little pied-à-terre. She painted and sketched the island’s nature, rode horses and went for long walks and swimming.

The island is relatively quick and easily reached from London on a 2-hour train ride plus a ferry or hovercraft trip.

>> Discover the Isle of Wight on foot with the Isle of Wight Coastal Walking holiday

>> Discover the Isle of Wight by bicycle with the Isle of Wight Cycle holiday

 

#2 Jersey

walking in Jersey - Channel Island Way - British Isles - Sherpa Expeditions

 

Jersey is the biggest island of the Bailiwicks of Guernsey & Jersey who have a separate economic and political life from Great Britain. The island has an ancient history: it was until several thousand years ago attached to mainland France with many Palaeolithic dolmans or burials from that period. It was known about in Roman times and later came under the control of the duke of Brittany during the Viking invasions. All in all, lots of historical and natural interest for the walker or cyclist.

>> Discover Jersey on foot with the Jersey: the Channel Island Way holiday

>> Discover Jersey by bicycle with the Channel Islands Cycle holiday

 

#3 Isle of Man

English Islands walking holidays - Sherpa Expeditions

 

According to legend, this British island was once ruled by Manannán who would draw his misty cloak around the island to protect it from invaders. One of the principal folk theories about the origin of the name Mann is that it is named after Manannán. The ancient Romans knew of the island and called it Insula Manavi, it is uncertain though whether they conquered the island or not. However, the Manx Gaelic for the island is Ellan Vannin, which just means island of Man.

Learn about Manx history and myths in the Manx Museum in Douglas, your port of arrival.  

>> Discover the Isle of Man on foot with the Isle of Man Coastal Path holiday

 

#4 Guernsey

Discover Guernsey one of the British Isles with Sherpa Expeditions

 

Known for scenic cliffs and beaches, small towns oozing old world charm, and coastal defences dating from the Palaeolithic period through to the Second World War, Guernsey has been a favourite holiday destination for active adventurers. After a long and turbulent history, Guernsey, similarly to Jersey and other islands, is now a British crown dependency, albeit not part of the UK or of the European Union.

Another island that is part of the Bailiwicks of Guernsey and Jersey. Each of the small islands have their own character and customs and this is very clear when you visit them all.

>> Discover Guernsey on foot with the Guernsey Islands – Channel Island Way holiday

>> Discover Guernsey by bicycle with the Channel Islands Cycle holiday

 

#5 Holy Island

Lindisfarne - Holy Island - British Isles for walking - Sherpa Expeditions

 

A causeway leads across the sands to Lindisfarne on Holy Island, just off the area of outstanding natural beauty that is the Northumberland Coast. Correct timing is essential here as the causeway gets covered by water for almost two quarters of each day. With Sherpa Expeditions you can overnight at this tiny British island, allowing you plenty of time to roam around.

When you have made it to Holy Island, the 16th Century Lindisfarne fortress and the priory ruins are a must-visit. The castle has even featured in films such as Macbeth and Cul-de-Sac, both by Roman Polanski.

>> Discover Holy Island on foot during the St Cuthbert’s Way holiday in 8 days 

>> Discover Holy Island on foot during the St Cuthbert's Way holiday in 10 days

 

Curious to learn more about some of these British isles? Or if you would like to make an enquiry to discover one of the above-mentioned islands on a cycling or walking holiday, please contact the team at our London office.